EURAU24 – Milano

European Research on Architecture
and Urbanism International Conference

IN-PRESENCE /
THE BODY AND
THE SPACE

The role of corporeity in the era of virtualization

MILAN, 19-22 JUNE 2024

Call for extended abstract - OPEN NOW!

The next EURAU International Conference – IN-PRESENCE / THE BODY AND THE SPACE – The Role of Corporeity in the Era of Virtualisation – will occur in Milan, 19-22 June 2024.

The EURAU Milan 2024 Conference aims to unpack the significance of corporeality in contemporary times and its relevance for the upcoming years. Specifically, the focus is on the relation between body and space and how this relates with architecture, the city and the environment, interpreted as physical facts and processes. Within the background of a technological turn, the focus is now on what has changed or will further change in this relationship and what instead remains unalterable, inherently bound to the material and impervious to the virtual. The call asks for contributions relating to the body-space-architecture relationship.

/DEADLINE 31st DECEMBER 2023
/ NEW DEADLINE 15th JANUARY 2024!

CALL EU24_sito

Topic

In an era in which many aspects of our society, lives, and disciplines are shifting ─ sometimes too lightly, others forcibly ─ from the physical to the immaterial, from the corporeal to the virtual, EURAU Milan 2024 Conference reflects on the current and future role of corporeality, examining what has changed and is changing, what is effectively irreducible from the material to the virtual intangible dimension and what, in terms of values and experiences, is gained or lost in this shift.  

EURAU Milan 2024 solicits researchers and professionals in the spheres of spatial studies, from architecture to urban and environmental design, planning and policies, artistic disciplines and experimentations, etcetera, to reflect on the conditions/practices/tools that require the presence of a body or several bodies in a space, whether small or large, indoor or outdoor, in order to be lived, experienced and realised authentically, and if so, how this is different and why this is crucial compared to technologically mediated, non-corporal, non-material, even non-human, experiences. 

Considering diverse points of view and arguments, the perspective of corporeality appears intimately linked to architecture and urbanism in multiple ways and through the many approaches over time. 

This vital link can be seen, for instance, if we consider the many perspectives from which space can be conceived: from the uses and the interpretations of space through ‘practices’, through a culturally-mediated perception of space, to the role of space itself as a source of sensory and environmental stimuli, to the production of space through design, or even to the social usability of space as a container of practices and events. 

Following this perspective, the spaces of architecture, the city and the environment can be inhabited thanks to, by and through the body and its physical extension. The body is the transit of the relationship between design and space, practices and society. Placing bodies at the core of our disciplinary discourses means interfering with their material, organic and affective narrative embracing their uncertainties and stumbles and dealing with the consequences. Bodies are traces of a creative multiplicity, interlaced with the possibility of an open and continuous dialogue with the world. 

This multifaceted relationship occurs in two principal ways: one as ‘acting bodies’, bodies that touch, bodies that act, bodies as actors of practices and actions, and as a tool for transformative reflection on space; and one as ‘acted bodies’, bodies as filters, bodies affected by the physical-spatial and environmental conditions of space. This dialectic between the body as an active medium and the body as passive exposure derives from Gilles Deleuze’s reading of Spinoza and carries with it the idea that ‘the body is the world, is made of the world, is at one with the world.’ 

Starting from the intention of investigating the space-body relationship, its modifications and resistances, the basic questions EURAU Milan 24 intends to ask are: 

/ Is this condition still actual? How much has it changed, and will it change in the coming years? 
/ What cannot change as it is effectively irreducible from the material to the virtual? 
/ How has the body-space relationship changed with the advent of new technologies? 
/ What still can a body do, and what can only be done by a body? 
/ What is the added value of a body-centred approach to our disciplines? 

The issue can be approached by questioning boldly a series of recent or well-known assumptions, which refer to different disciplinary fields but share a core theme: the co-presence and relationship of bodies in space. 

Furthermore, in the current global conditions − full of innovation but with multiple crises that must be overcome through collaboration and research aiming towards a different future − researchers and professionals are driven to question even the fundamental traits of our disciplines profoundly. What the recent crisis, starting from Covid-19, has reiterated is indeed the centrality of the individual bodies and of bodies interacting in space. 

Among the many emerging issues recently developed at the international level – for instance, the European Agenda or the international SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals), which points to sustainability, justice, equality, freedom, hospitality, health, a new and fairer economy, care for the most fragile people and territories, memory, beauty and socio-spatial transition – EURAU Milan 24 aims to underline and integrate the aspect of ‘togetherness’ that can be defined as being together, sharing practices and values through bodies and multiple, even non-physical bonds that occur within space. 

 

Themes / SESSIONS

The call asks for contributions relating to the body-space-architecture relationship.

The EURAU Milan 24 conference invites proposals that delve into the tapestry of the relationship between body and space, framed and articulated within five thematic areas:
/CONCEIVED, /INTER-ACTIVE, /AFFECTED, /VULNERABLE and /AUGMENTED. These five themes, as adjectives of the body as well as of the space, are intended as facets of a unique narration that is brought into focus through the exploration of each area. The cross-reading of these themes provides a comprehensive lens through which to investigate the dynamic interplay and the multiple layers that underlie the body-space relationship.  

Specifically, /CONCEIVED anchors the exploration in the realm of reflective and theoretical-experiential elaboration and its foundations. By going beyond the notion of body-space relations grounded in proportions, measurements and geometry, there is an opening towards new forms of action , inter-action and reflection.  

In the second session, contributions are asked to delve into the adjective /INTER-ACTIVE, which refers to the dynamics of active interaction in the body-space relationship highlighting how movement, gestures, and sensory engagement contribute to craft a tapestry weaving together the materiality of space and the embodied experience.  

The third theme, /AFFECTED, refers to the possible relationships and actions of the environment on the body, where the environment is understood as the artificial urban territory but also the natural and the natural and climatic domain. This thematic area underscores the profound impact of external factors on bodily experience. 

/VULNERABLE bodily experience as well as climatic and natural consequences on space, points at the potential role of a design approach that investigates the relationship between fragile bodies and space. The session is dedicated to the manifold layers of vulnerabilities of bodies in space, and their role as a critical contribution to refocus our disciplines. 

The last thematic area, /AUGMENTED disciplines towards the design and reflection of inclusivity, is dedicated to modified and enhanced bodies and the interaction between the physical body and virtual space or artificial intelligence. It explores the evolving landscape of technologically mediated interactions, as well as contemporary art interventions.

1/ CONCEIVED

/ On the Body-Space relationship mediated by reflection and theoretical-experiential elaboration.

In recent years, architecture has shifted its paradigm regarding the relationship between body and space. This transition towards a new understanding of actions, movement, and experience has flanked – and partially replaced – the traditional emphasis on proportion, measurement, and geometry.  

This evolution prompts a fundamental re-evaluation of how architecture, urbanism, and spatial practices conceptualise, theorise and practice the body-space relationship. To grasp the depth of this transformation, it is critical to delve into the historical modification of this relationship and the simultaneous and interacting, but at times conflicting, positions of contemporaneity. These perspectives encapsulate the past’s legacy and lay the ground for future explorations.  

The conceptual framework that underlies our understanding of the space-body relationship and its paradigms of reference, profoundly influences the design thought and process; it also informs our way of bodily inhabiting space through human and social practices. Therefore, thoroughly exploring this relationship’s conceptual and creative dimensions and foundational principles is crucial.  

Moreover, investigating the fundamental role of the space-body relationship also means recognising the multidisciplinary contributions that the world of culture and the arts have made to our subject area, where art, dance, cinema, theatre, and literature have played a fundamental role in reshaping our perception of this relationship in redefining its paradigms.

This session welcomes contributions which include but are not limited to:  
/ The body as a system of proportion, measurement, and geometry; 
/ The proxemics; 
/ The space as actions, movement, and experience of bodies;
/ The mind and the perception of the space; 
/ The body and the memory of the space; 
/ Bodily project practice and technological innovation;
/ Architecture as a space device;
/ ‘Spatial Design’: the space, the body and the synthesis of the arts;
/ Contemporary Art: interventions on space and human perception.

2/ INTER-ACTIVE

/ On the dynamics of active interaction in the body-space and bodies in the space relationship highlighting the role of presence, co-presence, movement, gestures, and sensory engagement in terms of embodied experience.

Today, we understand space neither as a cartesian entity merely defined by coordinates nor as a passive element identified by voids that we can occupy, observe, and cross. In addition to proportions, measures, and geometry, we now incorporate — as aesthetic categories but not only — actions, movement, and experience to appreciate and interpret contemporary spaces. It implies that bodies are acting and active agents affecting the connotation of space. The inter-active session interprets the relationship between body and space as mutually influencing, where their interactions nurture distinctive living habitats. Beyond a subject that produces space, the body is also a medium that, moving away from the tyranny of ‘oculacentrism’, perceives its tangible and intangible qualities. Therefore, we can understand what stands between the body and space, a realm of filters that affect our sensing capacity. Such filters, which emphasize, mediate, or negate body-space intertwining, are often the result of an architectural choice materializing with anything that can be perceived by our senses, from sight to touch and smell.   

The encounter of multiple bodies in space and their material experience converge in the construction of a space, resulting from an articulated and multifaceted, mediated and shared practice, where bodies become agents of transformation on different physical-spatial levels: bodies as actors in practices and actions, their interactive capacity; bodies active in the design of space (the eye, the hand, the sign); bodies and the construction of space (the survey, the construction site); bodies, space and didactics between presence and virtuality. With these premises, we can frame the production of space via architecture as an increasingly inter-active practice that involves a plurality of actors and actions through time.

The session welcomes contributions which include but are not limited to:  
/ Bodies as modification of living space; 
/ Bodies perceiving space through the senses; 
/ The eye, the hand, the sign: the active bodies in the design of space; 
/ Bodies and spaces as mediated relationship by filters, skins, dressings, envelopes, or other mediums and sensing tools;  
/ Interaction practices between bodies and temporality, e.g., theatre performances and others;  
/ Collaborative practices for the transformation of space, e.g., as co-design and others; 
/ The bodies and the construction of space: the survey, the building site, the journey; 
/ Bodies and didactics between real and virtual space.

 

3/ AFFECTED

/ On the possible relationships and actions of the environment on the body.

Built and natural environments can be considered spatial agents acting on bodies in their various features. This corporeal view seeks innovative ways to engage people with environmental challenges, tracing the relationship between the environment and bodies in guiding a spatial transformation and cultivating a shared understanding of this perspective on ‘affected’ bodies.     

Rather than relying on ideological stances, we draw inspiration from the experiential and corporeal aspects of the human body, how they are affected by architectural and urban spatial configurations, as well as by thermal comfort and – in general – the impact of the natural/artificial environment on it.   This theme encourages disciplines to interact with frontier knowledge, investigating the relationship between the body/space and other entities and organisms. 

Light, energy, temperature, fluids, and microorganisms generate/inform/form the experience of body/space, mutually modifying each other. Moreover, considering the physical and social body as a perceiving element, comprehending and interacting with the environment, and creating opportunities for environmental transformation also mean investigating the role of corporeity concerning commons in their action on territories and urban spaces.

To delve into the theme of affected bodies and expand the gaze towards the condition of the climate crisis means to question the current resilient practices and post-disaster modification from a body-centered perspective. Accordingly, it means observing emergencies but also temporally broadening the view towards the future to understand and interpret risk phenomena, environmental but not only, which affect daily life, the possibilities for transformation, and the relationship between body and space. By assuming this perspective, the session could touch on the contemporary definition of this relation and the historical transformation of the issue, looking at moments of shifting conditions or significant understanding of the topic.

The session welcomes contributions which include but are not limited to:  
/ The built and natural environment/body relationship; 
/ The body/environment relationship in defining relationships with climate and comfort issues;   
/ The body/space relation as an organism, where light, energy, temperature, fluids, and microorganisms generate/inform/shape the experience of the body-space, modifying each other; 
/ The city as a place of bodies: the relationship between body, city, and commons;  
/ The body affected by climate change: resilient transformation practices, and post-disaster transformations;
/ The relationship between body/climate/environmental risk. 

4/ VULNERABLE

/ On the potential role of a design approach that investigates the relationship between vulnerable bodies and space.

We live in a time of interconnected crises that have manifested a stratification of different forms of vulnerabilities. To disentangle the complexity of this crisis the design disciplines and practices have recentered the attention towards living bodies as a medium to refocus our disciplines. The intertwining of vulnerable bodies and vulnerable places challenges the preconception of ‘normality’, where the diversity of bodies calls for deconstructing fixed interpretations. Addressing various forms of vulnerability related to gender, ethnicity, class, religion, age, impairments and fragilities of bodies places the design exploration at the forefront of care, inclusion, safety, and accessibility.  

Historically, our cities have been built according to a ‘universal and neutral user’, flattening the everyday experience with the idea of ‘one size fits all’. However, space is not neutral: it becomes a place of constraint and a chance for practices to get formed in space, but it is also a place of conflicts, encounters and expulsions. In this sense, vulnerability is intended as a temporary or permanent condition of living bodies, which, because of how our cities, territories and buildings are designed and perceived through their visible and invisible barriers, struggle to access, use and inhabit spaces as well as be welcomed and recognised.  

The discourse about vulnerable bodies and their agency in the built environment calls for an interdisciplinary exploration where the different domains that converge in observing, interpreting, and modifying the cityscape raise the issues of unveiling the unseen bodies and the unheard voices, identifying the proper tools and methodologies.   

We encourage a cross-disciplinary reflection on how vulnerable bodies can generate a sense of agency and purpose in making visible their rights, their knowledge, and their identities in space, welcoming contributions that include but are not limited to:

/ The Vulnerable Body in Vulnerable Places;  
/ The body threatened: migrations and wars;   
/ The segregated/decolonized body, new geographies of body-space justice; 
/ The queer and gendered space, the space of minorities; 
/ Vulnerabilities Contextualized in space and time;  
/ From Awareness to Design: multidisciplinary practices and methods on body-space-centered justice;
/ Changing the Rules: Regulations and Guidelines beyond the standard and the quantitative parameters.

5/ AUGMENTED

/ On modified and enhanced bodies and the interaction between the physical body and virtual space or artificial intelligence.

The convergence of physical space and the augmented body is a rapidly evolving field with the potential to dramatically transform our interaction between the physical world and the digital realm. We could define the augmented body as a physical human body that has been technologically extended (XR) using augmented reality, virtual reality, wearable devices, or other digital technologies to enhance perception and physical or cognitive capabilities.   

Inquiring about the body-space relationships mediated by new systems of digitization can mean: discussing human-computer interactions in their different spatializations, assessing the impacts on the perception of space, exploring the possible effects on the design of physical space at different scales, questioning the educational and interaction capabilities of new technologies that hybridize body, space, and artificial intelligence, reflecting on the role of the digital to foster interaction, co-design and decision-making in the perspective of inclusive and open processes, to foster a growing awareness about the ethical and social implications of relating physical space and the augmented body.  

This session welcomes contributions which include but are not limited to: 
/ How XR technologies influence architectural and urban design, urban planning, and the creation of physical spaces;
/ Perceptual and cognitive shifts: exploring the space-based impact of XR on bodily perception, movement, and interaction; 
/ How can XR technologies be used to facilitate social interaction and collaboration, also through the new possibilities given by AR-based tools in BIM and GIS platforms; 
/ How can XR technologies be used to create more effective and engaging learning, educational and training experiences in physical spaces?  
/ Research on user-centred design, usability, and user satisfaction in augmented environments;
/ Wearable Technology and Its Impact on Daily Life; 
/ Human-Computer Interaction and user-experience in Augmented Environments; 
/ Interaction, co-design, deliberative and participations tools based on new technologies;  
/ Security Privacy and Identity Concerns in Augmented Spaces: how XR reshapes our understanding of the body, identity, privacy and self-expression; 
/ Historical perspectives: the evolution of mixed reality and its interaction with the physical self.

/ TRANSVERSAL PERSPECTIVES

Five operational perspectives intersect the thematic areas transversally: Theory, Research, Design, Education, Retrospective.

These propose to deal with the topics through five possible approaches, which can also be multiple and thus associated with more than one for the same contribution.  

They refer to the idea that the theme of the body-space relationship can be investigated according to different and interrelated modalities and perspectives, leaving space for the various theoretical and practical experiences that characterise the activity of the architect and urban planner, whether historian, theorist, designer, educator or professional. 

The thematic areas and transversal perspectives form a matrix where contributions can be freely placed.

HOW TO PARTECIPATE

/ HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT

Our last aim is to attract participants by offering an environment of inspiring presentations and debates. EURAU24 invites students, researchers and professionals from multiple fields: architects, anthropologists, artists, designers, engineers, economists, writers, geographers, historians, sociologists, urban planners, among others will join their forces with specific vision articulated in scientific articles.

Since EURAU24 is conceived as a symposium in progress, we will ask only for Extended Abstracts (1500 words). 

All the anstracts will be published in a dedicated book edited by PUBLICA. After EURAU24, a further selection of the presented papers will be made according to the debate in the Parallel Sessions, and they will be prepared as articles to be published in the prestigious magazine UOU Scientific Journal (https://revistes.ua.es/uou).

International experts, who are members of the Scientific Committee, will assess the Abstracts. The review process will be Double-Blind Peer Review according the topics.

You will be informed about the reference of your session and the time of your presentation 4 weeks before the event. 

The abstract will be presented in the official languages of the conference, English.

The abstract should contain:

1. Title and subtitle: maximum 150 characters;
2. Author(s) and Affiliation(s): Name Surname, University, Department, email. In case of multiple authors, provide only the email of the corresponding one;
4. Keywords: minimum 3, maximum 5, separated by a comma;
5. Text;
6. Bibliography;

The extended abstracts cannot exceed 1500 words (including notes and bibliography). Please follow the EDITORIAL NORMS downloadable on our website.

You can submit your abstract using the following FORM link.

NEW DEADLINE: 15th JANUARY 2024!

Format 
/ THE ROAD TO EURAU

The format of the conference results from a shared reflection, which started with a research seminar on the current state of scientific events held in March 2023 in Politecnico di Milano. As a network based on a deep-sharing approach to research and design, we have identified a flexible structure organized through diverse online and in-presence moments. The integration of modes allows for promoting a long-term format displayed from the summer of 2023 to the summer of 2024 called The Road to EURAU, engaging participants in bringing their contribution to the table and shaping the conference themes and contents. We proposed five preparatory thematic meetings organised by EURAU network partners to discuss this topic in advance. Each meeting introduced a different thematic approach to the conference topic. The outcomes of the meetings contributed to refining the thematic sessions of EURAU Milan 24 and informed the preparation of the open call. The aim was to activate an ongoing and wide-ranging discussion, fed by other forms of communication (a forum, an Instagram profile, a website), leading up to June 2024 as the final moment in which IN-PRESENCE will meet to draw conclusions.

The five meetings (with the previous themes’ names and order) were held by our international partners on:
1/ SPACE (01 September 2023)
2/ ENVIRONMENT (18 September 2023)
3/ INTER-ACTION (21 June 2023)
4/ VULNERABILITY (22 September 2023)
5/ VIRTUALITY (04 July 2023)

Past Thematic Meetings

People

/ Honor committee

Donatella Sciuto, Rector at the Politecnico di Milano 

Ilaria Valente, Vice-Rector for International Affairs at the Politecnico di Milano 

Andrea Campioli, Dean of AUIC School – Politecnico di Milano

Massimo Bricocoli, Director of DAStU Department – Politecnico di Milano)

 

/ Milan organising committee

Marco Bovati – Chair

Anna Moro – Chair

Daniele Villa – Chair

Virginia Vecchi – Event Manager

Gerardo Semprebon

Francesco Airoldi

Alisia Tognon 

Silvia Di Mauro

Kevin Santus

Stefano Sartorio

Arianna Luisa Nicoletta Scaioli 

Marco Vedoà

Erica Ventura

/ International Organising committee

Javier Sánchez Merina, University of Alicante

Roberta Amirante, Napoli Federico II 

Paola Scala, Napoli Federico II 

Joaquín Ibáñez Montoya, UPM Madrid 

Maria Jose Pizarro, UPM Madrid

Joaquín Alvado Bañon, University of Alicante

Gülsün Saglamer, Istanbul Technical University 

Pelin Dursun, Istanbul Technical University 

Beatrice Jöger, Ion Mincu University, Bucharest

Madalena Pinto Da Silva, University of Porto 

Carla Garrido de Oliveira, University of Porto

Gisela Lameira, University of Porto

Filipa Guerreiro, University of Porto

Martinez Sanchez Maria, RGU Aberdeen 

Maria Luna Nobile, UMA – Umeå Universitet 

Carla Collevecchio, UMA – Umeå Universitet 

José Lage, University of Porto 

Angela Kyriacou Petrou, University of Nicosia 

Maria Hadjisoteriou, University of Nicosia 

Hocine Aliouane-Shaw, ENSAP Bordeaux 

Marco Bovati, Politecnico di Milano

Anna Moro, Politecnico di Milano

Daniele Villa, Politecnico di Milano

/ SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

María Jose Pizarro, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

Joaquin Ibañez Montoya, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

Óscar Rueda, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

Silvia Colmenares, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

Jacobo García-Germán, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

David Casino, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

Maria Luna Nobile, Umeå University / Umeå School of Architecture 

Carla  Collevecchio, Umeå University / Umeå School of Architecture 

Fatma Erkök, ITU Istanbul Technical University  

Gülsün Saglamer, ITU Istanbul Technical University 

Pelin Dursun Çebi, ITU Istanbul Technical University 

Carla Garrido, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Filipa Guerreiro, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Gisela Lameira, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

José Alberto Lage, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Madalena Pinto da Silvia, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto

Daniel Comșa, ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

 

Hanna Derer, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

Ana Maria Zahariade, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning/ The Doctoral School of architecture 

Marina Mihăilă (Mihaila), “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

Beatrice-Gabriela Jöger, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

Maria J. Martinez Sanchez, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture / Robert Gordon University

Maria  Hadjisoteriou, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Angela K. Petrou, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Yiorgos Hadjichristou, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Alessandra Swiny, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Hocine Aliouane-Shaw, UMR-CNRS Passages / Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture et de Paysage de Bordeaux 

Elena-Codina Dușoiu, ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

Maria   Hadjisoteriou, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Angela K. Petrou, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Alessandra Swiny, University of Nicosia / Architecture Department 

Paola Scala, University of Naples Federico II 

Carmine Piscopo, University of Naples Federico II 

Orfina Francesca Fatigato, University of Naples Federico II 

Mihaela Zmfir (Grigorescu), ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

Roberta Amirante, University of Naples Federico II 

Paola Scala, University of Naples Federico II 

Javier Sánchez Merina, University of Alicante  

Joaquín Alvado Bañón, University of Alicante 

Massimiliano Campi, University of Naples Federico II 

Sarah Stevens, University of Brighton 

Charlotte Erckrath, Bergen School of Architecture 

Dávid Portschy Szabolcs, Budapest University of Technology and Economics 

Ionuț Anton, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

 

 

Aksoy Meltem, Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture   

Alemany Ester Gisbert, Alicante University   

Aliouane-Shaw Hocine, UMR-CNRS Passages, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture et de Paysage de Bordeaux 

Al Jumaily Arwa, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Alvado Bañón Joaquín, Alicante University   

Amirante Roberta – University of Naples Federico II   

Ionuț Anton, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

Armitt Matthew, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design   

Ataş Zeynep ̧, Mardin Artuklu University, Faculty of Architecture   

Avcı Ozan – MEF University, Faculty of Arts, Design and Architecture   

Avilés Angel Benigno González, Escuela de Arquitectura de Alicante  

Barosio Michela,, Politecnico di Torino 

Baslo Meltem, Istanbul Technical University /Faculty of Architecture   

Bassanese Silvia, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Belkouri Daria, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Berlingieri Fabrizia, Politecnico di Milano

Bevan Whitney, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Bianchi Irene, Politecnico di Milano

Boehm Carola, Staffordshire University  

Bovati Marco, Politecnico di Milano   

Bozzuto Paolo, Politecnico di Milano

Bricocoli Massimo, Politecnico di Milano   

Brown Martin, Staffordshire University   

Browne Jemma, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design / Birmingham City University 

Cálix Teresa, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Campi Massimiliano, University of Naples Federico II 

Capener David, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design   

Carvalho Antonio, Politecnico di Milano 

Casino David, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

Ciriquian Pablo Martí, Alicante University   

Cirugeda Almudena Nolasco, Alicante University   

Coelho Rodrigo, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Collevecchio Carla, Umeå University, Umeå School of Architecture 

Colmenares Vilata Silvia, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid   

Columbano Alessandro, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design   

Comsa Daniel, ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

Coppetti Barbara, Politecnico di Milano

Costa Sandra, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design   

Cozza Cassandra, Politecnico di Milano

Day Jonathan, Birmingham Institute of Creative Arts  

Derer Hanna, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture in Bucharest   

Deveci Gokay, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Dusoiu Elena-Codina, ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

Dring Michael, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design  

Dundjerovic Aleksandar, Royal Birmingham Conservatoire  

Dursun Çebi Pelin, Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture   

Erckrath Charlotte, Bergen School of Architecture 

Erkök Fatma – Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture  

Fairburn Jon, Staffordshire University  

Fatigato Orfina – University of Naples Federico II   

Fontanella Elena, Politecnico di Milano

Frost Christian, Head of School of Architecture at London Metropolitan University   

Gameira Gisela, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

García-Germán Jacobo, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid 

García Mayor Clara, Alicante University  

Garrido Carla, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Celia  Ghyka, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

González Avilés Ángel Benigno, Alicante University  

Gratton Nicola, Staffordshire University   

Guerreiro Filipa de Castro, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto  

Hadjisoteriou Maria, University of Nicosia   

Ibáñez Montoya Joaquín, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid   

Jöger Beatrice-Gabriela, Ion Mincu University of Architecture and Urban Planning   

Jones Martin, Staffordshire University  

Jones Mat, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design  

Kleanthouse Adonis, University of Nicosia  

Lage José Alberto, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Lameira Gisela, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto   

Machado Carlos, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto   

Marchigiani Elena, Università degli Studi di Trieste 

Marco Elena, University of the West England, Department of Architecture and the Built Environment   

Martínez Sánchez María J., Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University   

Menikou Markella /University of Nicosia   

Meraz Fidel A., University of the West England, Department of Architecture and the Built Environment   

Mihaila Marina, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture in Bucharest  

Moreno Joaquim, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto   

Moro Anna – Politecnico di Milano  

Nieto Enrique – Alicante University  

Nobile Maria Luna – Umeå University, Umeå School of Architecture   

Nourrigat Elodie – National Superior School of Architecture of Montpellier   

Oliveira Marta, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Oldani Andrea, Politecnico di Milano  

Pacchi Carolina, Politecnico di Milano

Paker Nurbin, Istanbul Technical University /Faculty of Architecture    

Pamfil Francoise, ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

Parra José, Escuela de Arquitectura de Alicante   

Pasqui Gabriele – Politecnico di Milano   

Paulino Raquel – FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto  

Pérez del Hoyo Raquel, Escuela de Arquitectura de Alicante   

Pritchard Douglas, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Petrisor Alexandru Ionut, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture in Bucharest   

Petrou Angela, University of Nicosia, Architecture Department 

Pinto da Silva Madalena, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto  

Piscopo Carmine –/University of Naples Federico II  

Pizarro Juanas María José, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid  

Portschy Szabolcs Dávid, Budapest University of Technology and Economics 

Póvoas Rui, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Rachel Sara, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design  

Rice Louis, University of the West England, Department of Architecture and the Built Environment   

Rodrigues José Miguel, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto   

Rueda Jiménez Óscar, ETSAM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid  

Sağlamer Gülsün, Former Rector, Istanbul Technical University   

Salman Huda, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Sánchez Merina Javier, Alicante University   

Scala Paola, University of Naples Federico II   

Scott Jonathan, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Semprebon Gerardo, Politecnico di Milano

Serrano Estrada Leticia, Escuela de Arquitectura de Alicante   

Setti Giulia, Politecnico di Milano

Sirvent Dani, Escuela de Arquitectura de Alicante  

Sousa José Pedro, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto   

Stan Angelica, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning 

Stevens Sarah, University of Brighton 

Swiny Alessandra, University of Nicosia, Architecture Department 

Tognon Alisia, Politecnico di Milano

Tolve Valerio, Politecnico di Milano

Travasso Nuno, FAUP Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto 

Trisciuoglio Marco, Politecnico di Torino 

Valente Ilaria, Politecnico di Milano 

Vialard Alice, Northumbria University, Department of Architecture  

Victoria Michele, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Vila Domini David, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Villa Daniele, Politecnico di Milano  

Voltini Marco, Politecnico di Milano

Vowels Hannah, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design   

Williams Julian, Westminster University London  

Wishart Gillian, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Xiao Jieling, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design  

Zahariade Ana Maria, “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning, The Doctoral School of Architecture 

Zaman Quazi, Scott Sutherland School of Architecture, Robert Gordon University 

Zanotto Francesca, Politecnico di Milano

Zmfir Mihaela, ”Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

Zhao Fang, Staffordshire University 

Program

/ IMPORTANT DATES

31 October 2023             Call for Extended Abstract

31 December 2023    15th January 2024      Extended Abstract Submission

Mid February 2024          First evaluation run

Mid March 2024                Re-submission of extended abstract 

Mid April 2024                   Final Acceptance of extended abstract / EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION

Mid May 2024                    Preparation of Book of Extended Abstract

19-22/06/2024               EM24 CONFERENCE

 

Venue

Registration & Fees

EArly BIRDS (15/04/2024)

Regular: € 300

Ph.D. Students: € 150

Companion and General Audience: € 100

*The fee covers:
Admission to all parallel sessions;
Admission to all keynotes conferences;
Access to EURAU24 Proceedings (digital format of the revised abstracts);
Author Certificate / Attendance Certificate (for general public and accompanying persons);
Lunches and coffee breaks;
Reception event;
Gala dinner*;
Costs for Como Lake journey (trip and lunch)*.

Standard (01/05/2024)

Regular: € 350

Ph.D. Students: € 200

Companion and General Audience: € 150

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